MTA Two-Stroke World Championship

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Doug Dubach led for a bit in the first moto, but amateur Rockstar Suzuki rider, Austin Howell eventually took the win.

Braaap! Remember that sound? Do you remember the sweet smell of premix racing fuel; the days when you could be at the track without getting your eardrums blown out, and when roost really didn’t hurt all that much? We do, and fortunately so do the folks at Glen Helen Raceway. Yesterday marked the return of a bygone era: the MTA Two-Stroke World Championship presented by FMF. While the name might be a little lofty, the feeling surrounding the event was genuine. Folks dusted off their old two-smokers and scoured the discount racks at their local shops for some premix for what turned out to be an excellent day of racing.

Tye Hames was hauling on his YZ250 in the second moto and easily walked away with the moto win

Tye Hames was hauling on his YZ250 in the second moto and easily walked away with the moto win

With classes for every age, skill level, and bike size, there was plenty of racing to be had. The track actually ran all the way up Mount St. Helen, and without a single four-stroke out there, it never got too rough or square-edged. In the LA Sleeve Pro Class, there was a great battle between Doug Dubach, Austin Howell, and Mike Sleeter in the first moto. All three riders led at one point, with Howell eventually opening up a lead for the win. However, the overall wound up going to Zip Ty/Husqvarna WORCS racer, Bobby Garrison who came through the pack in the second 30 minute moto to second place behind Tye Hames.

WORCS racer and occasional AMA Motocross National competitor, Bobby Garrison, showed that Husqvarna's are not a thing of the past by taking the overall win aboard his CR250.

WORCS racer and occasional AMA Motocross National competitor, Bobby Garrison, showed that Husqvarna's are not a thing of the past by taking the overall win aboard his CR250.

It is interesting to note something about the manufacturer presence at the Two-Stroke World Championship. People who have been around the sport for a while may recall that back in the 1990s, few companies considered race ready four-strokes a viable, or even realistic, approach for the future of motocross. At the time, KTM, Husqvarna, and eventually Yamaha were the only manufacturers to attempt building thumpers that could compete with contemporary two-strokes. Oh, what a difference a decade can make.

Now all of the major motorcycle companies focus the majority of their attention on four-stroke machinery, and while most still produce two-stroke bikes, Suzuki and Kawasaki no longer import them to the United States and Honda has simply stopped producing them all together. So it is a bit ironic that the only major companies still keeping their two-stroke customers happy (Yamaha, KTM, and Husqvarna) are the same companies that first saw four-strokes as the wave of the future.

Mike Sleeter got some great testing in at Glen Helen aboard his KTM 250SX. After leading about half of the first moto, Sleet Dog wound up finish third in the first moto. His fourth place in the second moto was good enough for third overall. Watch for Sleeter to make some big waves at Hangtown.

Mike Sleeter got some great testing in at Glen Helen aboard his KTM 250SX. After leading about half of the first moto, Sleet Dog wound up finish third in the first moto. His fourth place in the second moto was good enough for third overall. Watch for Sleeter to make some big waves at Hangtown where he will be racing a 2011 250SX two-stroke in the 450 Class!