Dunlop D756RR Introduction

(Note: Italicized sections are from Dunlop’s PR material.)

Are you serious about racing? If you are, you need to know just how serious Dunlop is about supporting motocross racers. Because now we’re taking racing to the next level by introducing an industry-first innovation: factory-spec motocross racing tires for the general public. Meet the new Dunlop D756RR-the Race Replica.

Dunlop’s 756 has a great reputation as one of the premier soft-to-intermediate terrain tires in motocross, and is a favorite of the TWMX staff. But Dunlop has taken things a step further by introducing the D756RR, a limited-edition Race Replica version of the same tire used by the Honda, Red Bull KTM, and Yamaha of Troy teams.

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Dunlop introduced the D756RR at Glen Helen, inviting the press and a bunch of Dunlop-sponsored teams and privateers out for a day of riding.

The factory team ride will forever remain a much-coveted goal in our sport, one that will always remain out of reach except for a very select few individuals. But for those racers who are serious about pressing on toward that ultimate goal-the factory team motocross ride-Dunlop has the tire for you: The D756RR Race Replica, the factory racing tire.

Large chunks of the Honda, Red Bull KTM, White Brothers, Yamaha of Troy, Motoworldracing.com, and Moto XXX teams were out on the track, and for some of them, it was the first time they’d ridden any outdoor tracks in quite a while, so it was a little test session for the start of the upcoming national season, a little over three weeks away from now.

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…development of the D756RR also included countless hours of testing by Dunlop’s professional test riders at Dunlop’s Huntsville Proving Ground in Alabama as well as other venues including Glen Helen and Carlsbad.

Using race machines equipped with data acquisition equipment, the testing team conducted every tire test imaginable, comparing standard D756 tires to the new D756RR tires. Timed starts were recorded from both dirt and concrete pads, and individual lap times and simulated races of varying length were also included in the testing regimen.

For example, when launching from a concrete pad onto a starting straight 185 feet long, an identical machine equipped with D756RR tires consistently held an edge over the standard D756 tires. This standing-start advantage averaged out to 0.20 second-a first-turn lead of about two to three bike-lengths, just from the launch alone! Lap times using the D756RR tires produced differences that were equally impressive. On the Huntsville motocross track, average lap times were consistently more than one second quicker per lap, which would translate to a 20-second edge by the end of a National-length moto (30 minutes plus two laps). On the smoother and shorter Huntsville Supercross circuit, the RR demonstrated a similar advantage, which would net a lead of more than 12 seconds at the end of a 20-lap race. That’s a serious advantage.

Glen Helen was in interesting form. As always, the concrete start pad was in place, but truckloads of sand had been added to the track since last weekend’s 4-Stroke World Championship in preparation for the upcoming national. Lots of ruts formed up, and there wasn’t much dust. It was sunny, and temps were in the just-right range.

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One of the interesting parts of the day were the large number of riders who were returning to action after injuries. YOT’s Craig Anderson, Red Bull KTM’s Grant Langston, Honda’s Nate Ramsey, Moto XXX’s Kyle Lewis, and Motoworldracing.com’s Daryl Hurley were all back on their bikes after layoffs for various injuries.

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But probably the most interesting part of watching the pro riders on the track was seeing Kevin Windham on a Honda CRF450. His style looked as fast, fluid and relaxed as ever, and he turned plenty of heads as he destroyed berms and flicked the big Honda four-banger around during his ever-amazing whips. Chad Watts, who’s working in-house at Honda on the CRF450, was also soaking up some rays at Glen Helen.

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This is a works tire for serious racers only; the limited-availability D756RR is not intended for the casual rider. But for top-level racers who focus on maximum traction rather than long tire life, the D756RR will provide a distinct advantage no other commercially available motocross tire can match. And even though the D756RR carries a higher price tag than the regular-production D756, when the checkered flag falls, discerning racers will know every extra penny has been well spent. In short, you can’t buy a factory bike, but now you can buy factory tires.

Translation: These tires aren’t cheap, and they’re not designed for long-lasting durability. But they’re designed to offer maximum traction at the expense of durability. Suggested retail on the 80/100-21 front tire is $113.43, while the 100/90-19 is $125.54, and the 110/90-19 will set you back $134.71. Yep, it does add to the cost of going racing, but it’s one less item separating the factory guys from the privateers.

By design, the increased grip makes the D756RR the ideal tire for the two-moto motocross format. Starting the first moto from a slick concrete starting pad to finishing the second moto on a rough and deteriorating track, the RR is made to outperform other tires over a wide variety of terrain and conditions. The RR provides less wheelspin off the pad, increased traction for greater acceleration on the straights and exiting corners, and better bump absorbsion for less kickback over braking and acceleration bumps.

Dunlop’s foremost test rider Danny Roberts said, “During our Supercross test at the Huntsville Proving Ground, the most noticeable improvement with the D756RR was in the whoops. The RR tracked straight and true every time with no kickback or wandering. With both standard and RR tires, I would pin the throttle in second gear all the way through the whoops and the RR gave me more confidence and was quicker every time.”

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“The new D756RR Race Replica tires are truly awesome. In terms of both traction and stability, the RRs are just way ahead of standard tires. There’s never been a production tire like this; I wish I could have been on tires like these when I was moving up through the ranks.” ┬┐Ricky Carmichael.

One of the demos that Dunlop set up at Glen Helen was a timed sprint competition, where riders used a regular 756, and then switched to a 756RR. They were timed from the gate to a point about 1/3 down the start straight, and could not only compare their times between sets of tires, but against RC’s start straight blasts. Ricky departed early so that he could head to Hollywood for his scheduled appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live, and unfortunately, Garth was too busy shooting photos to give it a shot, but we do have tires for testing, and we’ll give you a more complete test in a future issue of TWMX.

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Deconstruction: What Makes the D756RR Different

Construction of the D756RR begins with a step forward in carcass design. This racing tire carcass is engineered specifically to be much firmer compared to the standard D756. By incorporating a higher denier material plus a ply of polyester cord engineered at angles derived from the factory racing tires, a stiffer carcass could be produced. Thanks to this reinforced carcass, the RR offers a more stable platform that can be run at lower tire pressures to yield a larger footprint, yet it still retains its stability without rolling over in corners or deflecting over obstacles.

According to Rich Taylor, one of the motocross test riders working on the RR project, “Up until now, the standard D756 rear has been my favorite tire of choice everywhere. Even on a full-blown hard-pack track, I always run a standard D756. And now with a Race Replica version, it’s even better. It works so well on hard pack and yet it still hooks up when the riding conditions are loamy. Now, the RR is my new favorite rear tire. Compared to the standard D756 rear tire, the D756RR rear is more stable. It doesn’t bounce around as much so it’s easier to hold a line through fast sweeping corners. Especially in the loam, it doesn’t flex as much. It’s stiffer so it holds a better line and it tracks better. On hard-pack ground, it actually gets better traction because of the softer compound. It allows it to hook up better.

“The front is a lot better also. The front feels stiffer, so going into corners it hooks a better line and it won’t flex. The standard tire flexes a bit, and that gives the front end a tendency to push sometimes. The D756RR hooks up in the corners so well because it doesn’t flex as much. That’s the major difference with the front, and it’s a huge benefit. It’s so much better going into corners; slow corners, fast corners, it doesn’t matter. You have more confidence with the front end.”

Backed up by this firmer carcass, the D756RR rear tread can be composed of a softer, grippier rubber compound to produce the maximum amount of tire traction. This race compound is formulated with a specialized ultra-fine carbon black to yield higher grip from the beginning to the end of the tire’s use. More specifically, this compound is identical to the one used by factory team racers in 2002 and 2003, a formula that has proven wildly successful in the toughest races in the world. This softer compound hooks up on concrete starting pads, offering an incredible level of traction that yields incomparable holeshots. And thanks to its added traction, at the starting line there’s no need for long burnouts that will waste the tire.

Another tester, Doug Dubach, said, “We tested the standard D756 and D756RR tires on four-stroke and two-stroke motocross bikes, and with the new compound, the D756RR lays down better and gets better grip on the concrete pad. We did testing at several tracks, and the biggest difference you notice in the Race Replica tire compared to the standard D756 is the traction. It has the same technology that only the race team has been able to use exclusively, up until now.

“I’ve been racing on the exclusive factory race-spec tires becConstruction of the D756RR begins with a step forward in carcass design. This racing tire carcass is engineered specifically to be much firmer compared to the standard D756. By incorporating a higher denier material plus a ply of polyester cord engineered at angles derived from the factory racing tires, a stiffer carcass could be produced. Thanks to this reinforced carcass, the RR offers a more stable platform that can be run at lower tire pressures to yield a larger footprint, yet it still retains its stability without rolling over in corners or deflecting over obstacles.

According to Rich Taylor, one of the motocross test riders working on the RR project, “Up until now, the standard D756 rear has been my favorite tire of choice everywhere. Even on a full-blown hard-pack track, I always run a standard D756. And now with a Race Replica version, it’s even better. It works so well on hard pack and yet it still hooks up when the riding conditions are loamy. Now, the RR is my new favorite rear tire. Compared to the standard D756 rear tire, the D756RR rear is more stable. It doesn’t bounce around as much so it’s easier to hold a line through fast sweeping corners. Especially in the loam, it doesn’t flex as much. It’s stiffer so it holds a better line and it tracks better. On hard-pack ground, it actually gets better traction because of the softer compound. It allows it to hook up better.

“The front is a lot better also. The front feels stiffer, so going into corners it hooks a better line and it won’t flex. The standard tire flexes a bit, and that gives the front end a tendency to push sometimes. The D756RR hooks up in the corners so well because it doesn’t flex as much. That’s the major difference with the front, and it’s a huge benefit. It’s so much better going into corners; slow corners, fast corners, it doesn’t matter. You have more confidence with the front end.”

Backed up by this firmer carcass, the D756RR rear tread can be composed of a softer, grippier rubber compound to produce the maximum amount of tire traction. This race compound is formulated with a specialized ultra-fine carbon black to yield higher grip from the beginning to the end of the tire’s use. More specifically, this compound is identical to the one used by factory team racers in 2002 and 2003, a formula that has proven wildly successful in the toughest races in the world. This softer compound hooks up on concrete starting pads, offering an incredible level of traction that yields incomparable holeshots. And thanks to its added traction, at the starting line there’s no need for long burnouts that will waste the tire.

Another tester, Doug Dubach, said, “We tested the standard D756 and D756RR tires on four-stroke and two-stroke motocross bikes, and with the new compound, the D756RR lays down better and gets better grip on the concrete pad. We did testing at several tracks, and the biggest difference you notice in the Race Replica tire compared to the standard D756 is the traction. It has the same technology that only the race team has been able to use exclusively, up until now.

“I’ve been racing on the exclusive factory race-spec tires because I have that option, being a contracted factory rider. That’s one of the special perks that I enjoy, and it’s been a real advantage over the years. However, with the introduction of this new D756RR, I wouldn’t even bat an eye if they handed me the RR instead of a full race-spec tire-the new tire is that good.”

Granted, the softer RR compound will wear out more quickly than the compound used in the standard D756, but for top-tier racers the cost incurred by more frequent replacement is more than offset by the RR’s superior results. In addition, this advanced design delivers superior traction all the way through from the beginning of tire use to the end of tire life.

because I have that option, being a contracted factory rider. That’s one of the special perks that I enjoy, and it’s been a real advantage over the years. However, with the introduction of this new D756RR, I wouldn’t even bat an eye if they handed me the RR instead of a full race-spec tire-the new tire is that good.”

Granted, the softer RR compound will wear out more quickly than the compound used in the standard D756, but for top-tier racers the cost incurred by more frequent replacement is more than offset by the RR’s superior results. In addition, this advanced design delivers superior traction all the way through from the beginning of tire use to the end of tire life.