TWMX All Access: Moto Trendz Mobile Moto Development

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This week we check in with Steve Beckstoffer, the driving force behind Moto Trendz Moto Development.

TransWorld Motocross: Can you describe what Moto Trendz is?

Steve Beckstoffer: I get that question a lot. We do parts and accessory sales, and custom service. The custom service thing is what people are really latching onto. That’s where we actually come on site for riders and enthusiasts—everyone from the weekend warrior to the avid racers. We bring everything that they need done to or for their bikes directly to them.


The Moto Trendz van has become a familiar site on So. Cal. freeways.

It’s a convenience. It’s a time and money-saving operation and it’s new.

TWMX: Sort of a personal moto valet?

SB: Kind of. It’s not a mobile trackside sales thing by any means. When people know what they want, or know what they want done, they call us, and we take it from there. They really don’t have to lift a finger other than to let us know what’s up.

We can be your personal dealer, whether it’s just delivering parts to your door, office, or wherever. Also, if companies have deadlines or anything from photo shoots—things that they could use an extra set of hands or wheels, we provide that, too. We’re still seeing if that aspect of the company is going to come around. It’s relatively untapped.

TWMX: Which companies are you hooked up with?

SB: I have dealerships like any storefront dealer with graphics companies like One Industries and N-Style; and power equipment from Bill’s Pipes, Pro Circuit and FMF. Any of those everyday parts and accessories, I can get. There might be a few odds and ends I’m still trying to work out. Some of the vendors still want a traditional storefront. They want you to stock a certain amount of product and display it in your shop. That’s not what we do. But I think as we’ve all seen for however many years, the industry is growing in all different angles, and there’s room for this, too.

TWMX: Are some of the manufacturers warming to the idea?

SB: Yes. Some like the idea right off the bat, that’s why they give me the chance and give me dealer status. There are still a couple that say, “No, you need a storefront.” It limits me just a little bit, but nothing that I’ve felt the affect of.

All the goodies and parts, we’re dialed in. We can usually get what the customers want. There are certain companies out there that are friends or who have helped us out a little bit more, and we’ll try to push their product a little but, but ultimately it’s up to the consumer. Whatever they want, we do.

TWMX: How about service?

SB: On the service side of the thing, I have two mechanics who have race team backgrounds and will do anything from change your oil to modifications. We do some of our own cylinder, head and carb modifications. We try to push that onto the big guys who do it, but we also do a little of our own. We do everythg from building wheels to complete bottom ends. That’s where most of our business is coming from.

TWMX: Do you have your own shop facility?

SB: Our mechanics have their own shop spaces, and if I don’t do it myself onsite, I bring it out to them. They’re both local, and they handle it from there.

TWMX: What’s your background?

SB: I’ve been in the industry since 1997 or 1998 with a number of companies, including Spy Optics. I was with RG3 Suspension for a little while, and did a lot of other odds and ends for a few other companies throughout the years. Most recently I was working for Fox Racing.

My experience goes from sales to marketing type stuff, all the way to working on forks and shocks and rider support. That’s kind of what led me to taking my own steps to do this.


Steve Beckstoffer.

TWMX: Is this something you can make a living from?

SB: I’m lucky enough to have other incomes from other areas that allows me to do this. If I had to do it on my own, and just rely on Moto Trendz? No. But I think once the word’s out, and we start building a bigger and better foundation of clients and awareness, I think so.

We want to see about five of these vans rolling around, and start hiring people. One thing that I thought when we first started this was that maybe we could franchise this idea. Of course Southern California is the hub of this whole thing, so this is where it has to start and see if it’s going to work. Maybe we’ll venture out to Northern California. I think there are a lot of options that even I don’t realize yet, as soon as people start thinking about it.

TWMX: Do you do internet sales?

SB: It’s funny you ask. I got asked by someone at a graphics company the other day, “Are you doing any e-commerce?” No, because there are so many big guys out there that I haven’t really thought about it. You’d have to set up a whole new business for that. You’d need a warehouse full of inventory. To do this, what I’ve started now, didn’t take much. I had quite a bit, I had the contacts, and it took a small amount to get it started, and that’s where I’m at now. We got set back a little by the local thieves…

TWMX: Yeah, you’d mentioned that before. What happened?

SB: Our van was stolen. They took all the stuff that was our presentation. Our EZ-Ups, my personal tools; and my own personal bike, which was Justin Buckelew’s supercross bike. They took my own personal gear. They took the cabinetry that was plugged into the side of the van. They knew what they wanted. I just don’t get to have some of my fun stuff. It’s not like they took the banks accounts. It didn’t set me back that much, other than I don’t have some of the cool things anymore, but that’s not going to get me more business.

We got the vehicle back, that was the big thing. We spent a lot of money and effort into the paint and graphics. It’s our rolling billboard. Everyone’s seen this van, which is good. We have the web address on the side, so if they want to find out a little bit more, just get on the site. It’s pretty good.

TWMX: Who’s your typical customer?

SB: Uusally guys who can spend a little bit of money, probably because they’ve spent a lot of time working. Whether it’s a fireman or average businessman that has kids that have bikes. They don’t have the time. They know what they’re doing, they could do it, but for them it’s just a matter of, “Let’s have someone else come out and bang this out and then we’re ready to ride.”

For a lot of guys it’s maintenance. Then they’ll throw some parts on here and there. “Yeah, I want you to throw me in some plastic.” It’s more of a maintenance issue, things they don’t feel comfortable with. We’ll remove suspension to be revalved, we’ll take motors out for service. Your average motorcycle rider, they don’t want to pull cylinders whole motors, or forks and shocks.

TWMX: How are your fees set up? Is it hourly? A flat fee?

SB: It’s not hourly. That’s what dealerships do, and we try not to do that. Different jobs can have different price ranges, because you know what it involves to do it. Just because it takes an hour doesn’t mean it’s all that difficult or risky. If you want your top end serviced, it’s one flat rate. We have transit charges, too, but it’s a flat per job rate. I’ll either tell them over the phone, or they can find some of the prices on the web site.

Just by comparison, our rates are structured so differently from dealerships. They have to run a certain way. I don’t want to bag on them, but we have flexibility to get those prices down for people, and it makes it more affordable for them. I think that’s why we’ll be successful.

TWMX: What areas do you cover?

SB: From L.A. county to San Diego county. Obviously, if you’re in Encino, you’re going to pay a little bit just for us to get there, and if you’re in Corona you’re not going to pay very much, if at all.

TWMX: How much have you seen things grow over the last seven months?

SB: It’s growing. It’s not exponentially, but month-by-month it grows. More phone calls come in…even if it’s not money in hand, it’s interest and communication, and the awareness keeps growing.

Most of the business so far has come in from me being out at the track, talking to people, shaking hands and letting them know that what it’s really about.

TWMX: How much did you research this before you launched it?

SB: I probably had this business plan back in 1999. It was structured a little differently and I presented it to a few people in the industry, like Mitch Payton, and some other guys, just to see what they felt. A lot of people liked it, but it was sort of the wrong place and wrong time. I wasn’t able to pursue it. The idea’s been around for four years or so, but I’m getting around to fine-tuning it and putting it into action.

Being an enthusiast and being around as long as I have, I can see a need. I hear what people are talking about and asking for. It’s a convenience that I see working, and it is working.

Contact:

Moto Trendz Mobile Moto Development
420 McKinley #111-496
Corona, CA 92879
Phone/Fax: (909) 737-4304

www.mototrendz.com

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e and there. “Yeah, I want you to throw me in some plastic.” It’s more of a maintenance issue, things they don’t feel comfortable with. We’ll remove suspension to be revalved, we’ll take motors out for service. Your average motorcycle rider, they don’t want to pull cylinders whole motors, or forks and shocks.

TWMX: How are your fees set up? Is it hourly? A flat fee?

SB: It’s not hourly. That’s what dealerships do, and we try not to do that. Different jobs can have different price ranges, because you know what it involves to do it. Just because it takes an hour doesn’t mean it’s all that difficult or risky. If you want your top end serviced, it’s one flat rate. We have transit charges, too, but it’s a flat per job rate. I’ll either tell them over the phone, or they can find some of the prices on the web site.

Just by comparison, our rates are structured so differently from dealerships. They have to run a certain way. I don’t want to bag on them, but we have flexibility to get those prices down for people, and it makes it more affordable for them. I think that’s why we’ll be successful.

TWMX: What areas do you cover?

SB: From L.A. county to San Diego county. Obviously, if you’re in Encino, you’re going to pay a little bit just for us to get there, and if you’re in Corona you’re not going to pay very much, if at all.

TWMX: How much have you seen things grow over the last seven months?

SB: It’s growing. It’s not exponentially, but month-by-month it grows. More phone calls come in…even if it’s not money in hand, it’s interest and communication, and the awareness keeps growing.

Most of the business so far has come in from me being out at the track, talking to people, shaking hands and letting them know that what it’s really about.

TWMX: How much did you research this before you launched it?

SB: I probably had this business plan back in 1999. It was structured a little differently and I presented it to a few people in the industry, like Mitch Payton, and some other guys, just to see what they felt. A lot of people liked it, but it was sort of the wrong place and wrong time. I wasn’t able to pursue it. The idea’s been around for four years or so, but I’m getting around to fine-tuning it and putting it into action.

Being an enthusiast and being around as long as I have, I can see a need. I hear what people are talking about and asking for. It’s a convenience that I see working, and it is working.

Contact:

Moto Trendz Mobile Moto Development
420 McKinley #111-496
Corona, CA 92879
Phone/Fax: (909) 737-4304

www.mototrendz.com

Sponsored by: