Monday Kickstart Presented by One Industries – San Diego SX

In case you didn’t already know, round six of the Monster Energy AMA Supercross series in San Diego, California, was a mudder. Just as the night program began, the clouded skies that everyone was experiencing during the day quickly changed into steady rainfall throughout the evening. In the Lites class, Geico Powersports/Honda’s Eli Tomac dominated the field while TwoTwo Motorsports’ Chad Reed did likewise in the Supercross class. But enough about what went down on the track, take a look at everything that was going on in the pits during the long day of waiting for practice and racing to begin.

Rain pounded the Southern California area in the days leading up to the race. Thankfully, Dirt Wurx was able to finish the track and get it covered before the biggest part of the storm hit. Due to the conditions, the AMA decided to postpone practice until 4:35, giving each class only two eight-minute qualifying sessions before racing began. All told, qualifying only lasted a little over an hour.

Rain pounded the Southern California area in the days leading up to the race. Thankfully, Dirt Wurx was able to finish the track and get it covered before the biggest part of the storm hit. Due to the conditions, the AMA decided to postpone practice until 4:35, giving each class only two eight-minute qualifying sessions before racing began. All told, qualifying only lasted a little over an hour.

When we first arrived at the stadium, this is what we saw. Gigantic pools of water were all over the track, but were pumped off before the track was uncovered.

When we first arrived at the stadium, this is what we saw. Gigantic pools of water were all over the track, but were pumped off before the track was uncovered.

At one point, the weather was so nice everyone was questioning if the forecasted rain was actually going to hit. As if on queue, though, the rain hit right before the first drop of the gate.

At one point, the weather was so nice everyone was questioning if the forecasted rain was actually going to hit. As if on queue, though, the rain hit right before the first drop of the gate.

Alpinestars had a new hospitality tent set up in the San Diego pits. Nearly everything that the company makes was on display for fans to check out.

Alpinestars had a new hospitality tent set up in the San Diego pits. Nearly everything that the company makes was on display for fans to check out.

Quite a few of the teams had two bikes under their tents. While they aren't allowed to swap out bikes once one is ridden in practice, many teams used a spare bike for parts and to ensure nothing was left to chance.

Quite a few of the teams had two bikes under their tents. While they aren't allowed to swap out bikes once one is ridden in practice, many teams used a spare bike for parts and to ensure nothing was left to chance.

With practice postponed to 4:35, many teams and riders were left with plenty of time to hangout and prep the bikes for the inevitable mudfest that was to come. Needless to say, things were pretty quiet for much of the day.

With practice postponed to 4:35, many teams and riders were left with plenty of time to hangout and prep the bikes for the inevitable mudfest that was to come. Needless to say, things were pretty quiet for much of the day.

Every time there is a mud race, teams and riders change up numerous aspects of the bikes. While quite a few of the teams didn't go all out when it came to mud preparation, seats did get changed, foam was added in key areas, and duct tape was strategically placed. Here's a shot of the seat that last week's winner Trey Canard ran for the race. Many riders elected to run pleated seat covers in order to help give them better grip in the wet and muddy conditions.

Every time there is a mud race, teams and riders change up numerous aspects of the bikes. While quite a few of the teams didn't go all out when it came to mud preparation, seats did get changed, foam was added in key areas, and duct tape was strategically placed. Here's a shot of the seat that last week's winner Trey Canard ran for the race. Many riders elected to run pleated seat covers in order to help give them better grip in the wet and muddy conditions.

Josh Hansen also elected to run a pleated seat cover to help keep himself in place in the mud.

Josh Hansen also elected to run a pleated seat cover to help keep himself in place in the mud.

Hansen also had some grip tape added to the side of his KX250F. The added grip no doubt helped to keep a hold of the bike in the muddy conditions, which due to his broken hand, Hansen needed all the added grip he could get.

Hansen also had some grip tape added to the side of his KX250F. The added grip no doubt helped to keep a hold of the bike in the muddy conditions, which due to his broken hand, Hansen needed all the added grip he could get.

According to his Twitter after practice, Hansen's broken hand was bothering him much more than he initially thought. Hanny Tweeted,

According to his Twitter after practice, Hansen's broken hand was bothering him much more than he initially thought. Hanny Tweeted, "Having the worst problems with my hand. Keeps falling out of place especially when I over-jumped the triple." He continued with, "Just got an x ray. I have to get a plate and screws next week." Hanny managed to gut out a sixth place finish in the main event, which was enough to keep him in the points lead by three points.

Tyla Rattray was back in action in San Diego after taking some time off due to injuring his back while riding at press day for Anaheim II. Here, his mechanic gets his bike ready for the mud by adding foam and wire screen to the front of his radiators.

Tyla Rattray was back in action in San Diego after taking some time off due to injuring his back while riding at press day for Anaheim II. Here, his mechanic gets his bike ready for the mud by adding foam and wire screen to the front of his radiators.

 Most of the riders elected to install handguards on their bikes. Monster Energy Kawasaki's Ryan Villopoto had these Acerbis guards on his bike.

Most of the riders elected to install handguards on their bikes. Monster Energy Kawasaki's Ryan Villopoto had these Acerbis guards on his bike.

Like we said, many mechanics used duct tape to both keep mud and water out of parts of the bike and to direct it away from others. The duct tape here was on Ryan Dungey's Rockstar/Makita/Suzuki and is strategically placed to channel water out and away from the airbox.

Like we said, many mechanics used duct tape to both keep mud and water out of parts of the bike and to direct it away from others. The duct tape here was on Ryan Dungey's Rockstar/Makita/Suzuki and is strategically placed to channel water out and away from the airbox.

Dungey's mechanic Mike Gosselaar put mesh around the shock in order to keep mud from building up and causing excessive wear on the shock shaft and moving parts.

Dungey's mechanic Mike Gosselaar put mesh around the shock in order to keep mud from building up and causing excessive wear on the shock shaft and moving parts.

Here's another example of the duct tape channel that Kyle Cunningham's mechanic created. You can also see the extra covering on the airfilter that helps to keep mud and water out of the airbox.

Here's another example of the duct tape channel that Kyle Cunningham's mechanic created. You can also see the extra covering on the airfilter that helps to keep mud and water out of the airbox.

Both James Stewart and Kyle Regal had foam glued to the under side of both the front and rear fenders on their San Manuel Band of Mission Indians/Yamaha's. The foam helps to keep the mud from sticking. Mud can add a considerable amount of weight to the bikes and keeping it from sticking ultimately helps improve the handling of the bike during the race.

Both James Stewart and Kyle Regal had foam glued to the under side of both the front and rear fenders on their San Manuel Band of Mission Indians/Yamaha's. The foam helps to keep the mud from sticking. Mud can add a considerable amount of weight to the bikes and keeping it from sticking ultimately helps improve the handling of the bike during the race.

Austin Stroupe's VMS/Yamaha had this mesh screen covering his radiators. The mesh also helps to reduce mud from sticking to the radiator louvers and ultimately reduces weight during the race.

Austin Stroupe's VMS/Yamaha had this mesh screen covering his radiators. The mesh also helps to reduce mud from sticking to the radiator louvers and ultimately reduces weight during the race.

Not only do the mechanics have to work overtime during a mud race, the goggle guys are probably some of the busiest in the pits.

Not only do the mechanics have to work overtime during a mud race, the goggle guys are probably some of the busiest in the pits. "I had to build five tear off goggles and five roll off goggles for each of our riders," said Scott's Jonathan Knowles. "It's roughly 150 pairs of goggles." This bag of goggles was fully prepped and ready to go for Stroupe.

Here's a close up look at a set of Scott goggles that are ready to go for the mud. In order to provide as much protection from mud build-up, two tear offs are installed over the roll offs. The lens also has small raised bumps on it in order to keep the roll off film from sticking to the lens in the event that water gets underneath.

Here's a close up look at a set of Scott goggles that are ready to go for the mud. In order to provide as much protection from mud build-up, two tear offs are installed over the roll offs. The lens also has small raised bumps on it in order to keep the roll off film from sticking to the lens in the event that water gets underneath.

Not only does Steve Matthes work as a journalist, but he also is EKS Brand's goggle guy, prepping goggles for all the company's riders. For practice, he elected to equip the goggles with tear offs, but said that for the night show, he would install roll offs.

Not only does Steve Matthes work as a journalist, but he also is EKS Brand's goggle guy, prepping goggles for all the company's riders. For practice, he elected to equip the goggles with tear offs, but said that for the night show, he would install roll offs.

Now that's a lot of tear offs!

Now that's a lot of tear offs!

We came across this very cool new wrist brace that DNS Shred Stix/Star Racing/Yamaha's Nick Paluzzi just took delivery of before San Diego. The new brace from Allsport Dynamics is now attached to the glove and features an adjustable stop, which is mounted on top of the brace. The fact that the brace can be attached to the glove is worth noting, as it helps to keep extra material out of the palm of the hand.

We came across this very cool new wrist brace that DNS Shred Stix/Star Racing/Yamaha's Nick Paluzzi just took delivery of before San Diego. The new brace from Allsport Dynamics is now attached to the glove and features an adjustable stop, which is mounted on top of the brace. The fact that the brace can be attached to the glove is worth noting, as it helps to keep extra material out of the palm of the hand.

Again, thanks to the abbreviated schedule, a lot of the teams had quite a bit of time on their hands. Kevin Windham's mechanic Chad Sanner was hiding a Geico Gecko in different locations on K-Dub's machine.

Again, thanks to the abbreviated schedule, a lot of the teams had quite a bit of time on their hands. Kevin Windham's mechanic Chad Sanner was hiding a Geico Gecko in different locations on K-Dub's machine.

If you've ever wondered how the factory mechanics cut such nice holes in the fork guards to mount holeshot devices, wonder no more. We caught Josh Hansen's mechanic Derek Brush heating up a small punch with the torch and then melting it through the guard. The technique creates a perfect pilot hole that you can then drill into a larger hole.

If you've ever wondered how the factory mechanics cut such nice holes in the fork guards to mount holeshot devices, wonder no more. We caught Josh Hansen's mechanic Derek Brush heating up a small punch with the torch and then melting it through the guard. The technique creates a perfect pilot hole that you can then drill into a larger hole.

Honda Racing's Josh Grant will be sitting out the remainder of the Supercross season. After injuring his knee at the second round in Phoenix, Grant went under the knife to have it fixed. Since then he has started riding again, however, he came to find out that more work was needed and he went back into surgery to repair his ACL. Word is that he will be back for the Nationals, and both him and Honda felt the move was the smartest decision.

Honda Racing's Josh Grant will be sitting out the remainder of the Supercross season. After injuring his knee at the second round in Phoenix, Grant went under the knife to have it fixed. Since then he has started riding again, however, he came to find out that more work was needed and he went back into surgery to repair his ACL. Word is that he will be back for the Nationals, and both him and Honda felt the move was the smartest decision.

During the day, the sun actually came out for a fair amount of time, allowing everyone to cruise around and have some fun in the pits. Here, FMF's Jeff Northrop and Jen Garfinkle cruised the pits in Rock River's Rhino. Northrop is recovering from a broken femur, but is doing quite well now. FMF also had the late Nathan Woods' race bike on display in their booth along with a way for people to donate to a fund to help support his family.

During the day, the sun actually came out for a fair amount of time, allowing everyone to cruise around and have some fun in the pits. Here, FMF's Jeff Northrop and Jen Garfinkle cruised the pits in Rock River's Rhino. Northrop is recovering from a broken femur, but is doing quite well now. FMF also had the late Nathan Woods' race bike on display in their booth along with a way for people to donate to a fund to help support his family.

Troy Lee Designs/Lucas Oils/Honda's Christian Craig was hanging out in the pits at San Diego. Craig has been recovering from a gnarly crash that he had when Tyla Rattray and him came together during the opening lap of their heat race in Los Angeles. Craig said that he is healing up well and just got released to walk around without crutches.

Troy Lee Designs/Lucas Oils/Honda's Christian Craig was hanging out in the pits at San Diego. Craig has been recovering from a gnarly crash that he had when Tyla Rattray and him came together during the opening lap of their heat race in Los Angeles. Craig said that he is healing up well and just got released to walk around without crutches.

This was what the starting gate looked like during track walk. We saw eventual winner Chad Reed checking out the gate during track walk and when he stepped directly behind the gate, his foot sunk in almost six inches or more. Yes, the mud was deep.

This was what the starting gate looked like during track walk. We saw eventual winner Chad Reed checking out the gate during track walk and when he stepped directly behind the gate, his foot sunk in almost six inches or more. Yes, the mud was deep.

A bike wash station was set up for riders to wash the mud off before heading back to the pits. Unlike Anaheim, though, teams were allowed to wash bikes in the pits. Needless to say, only privateers used the pressure washers located in the tunnel.

A bike wash station was set up for riders to wash the mud off before heading back to the pits. Unlike Anaheim, though, teams were allowed to wash bikes in the pits. Needless to say, only privateers used the pressure washers located in the tunnel.

Not only did the abbreviated practice schedule mean short qualifying sessions, but it also meant that the time between the two eight-minute sessions was much shorter as well. We dropped in on the Monster Energy Kawasaki pits between sessions and saw everyone on the team lending a helping hand to get the bikes prepped and ready for the second outing on the muddy track.

Not only did the abbreviated practice schedule mean short qualifying sessions, but it also meant that the time between the two eight-minute sessions was much shorter as well. We dropped in on the Monster Energy Kawasaki pits between sessions and saw everyone on the team lending a helping hand to get the bikes prepped and ready for the second outing on the muddy track.

DNA Shred Stix/Star Racing/Yamaha's Nick Paluzzi came only a few turns from winning his first heat race. If it wasn't for this aggressive pass put on the Yamaha rider by Geico Powersports/Honda's Jimmy DeCotis, Paluzzi would have had it. When the two riders came together, the both slowed enough for Monster/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki's Broc Tickle to take over the lead dropping Paluzzi to third and DeCotis to second.

DNA Shred Stix/Star Racing/Yamaha's Nick Paluzzi came only a few turns from winning his first heat race. If it wasn't for this aggressive pass put on the Yamaha rider by Geico Powersports/Honda's Jimmy DeCotis, Paluzzi would have had it. When the two riders came together, they both slowed enough for Monster/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki's Broc Tickle to take over the lead dropping Paluzzi to third and DeCotis to second.

Geico Powersports/Honda's Eli Tomac was all smiles following his first-ever Supercross victory. The rookie racer dominated the entire race, taking the holeshot, pulling away, and eventually winning the race by a very healthy margin.

Geico Powersports/Honda's Eli Tomac was all smiles following his first-ever Supercross victory. The rookie racer dominated the entire race, taking the holeshot, pulling away, and eventually winning the race by a very healthy margin.

Unfortunately for Eli, though, he couldn't get his champagne bottle open in time and was ambushed by both Tickle and Tyla Rattray.

Unfortunately for Eli, though, he couldn't get his champagne bottle open in time and was ambushed by both Tickle and Tyla Rattray.

Ryan Villopoto's main event didn't go exactly to plan, as a first lap crash left him in dead last and without a front number plate or rear fender. By the end of the race, however, RV had managed to climb all the way back up to seventh. It was enough to keep him in the points lead.

Ryan Villopoto's main event didn't go exactly to plan, as a first lap crash left him in dead last and without a front number plate or rear fender. By the end of the race, however, RV had managed to climb all the way back up to seventh. It was enough to keep him in the points lead.

DNA Shred Stix/Star Racing/Yamaha's Nick Paluzzi had a cool new helmet with the nickname of

DNA Shred Stix/Star Racing/Yamaha's Nick Paluzzi had a cool new helmet. Due to the mud, though, he didn't race with it.

Troy Lee Design/Honda's Travis Baker was out of action after hitting the over-under tunnel at Anaheim II and lacerating his index finger and breaking his ring finger. The impact didn't cause him to crash, though; the fingers were actually crushed by the clutch lever smashing against them. Photo by Casey Davis

Troy Lee Design/Honda's Travis Baker was out of action after hitting the over-under tunnel at Anaheim II and lacerating his index finger and breaking his ring finger. The impact didn't cause him to crash, though; the fingers were actually crushed by the clutch lever smashing against them. Photo by Casey Davis

With Baker out of action, his bike was used to display this very cool Adidas seat cover. We've shown this to you in past Kickstarts, but thought it was worth another look. It's made from the same material as Adidas shoes and has actual Adidas striping on it. Photo by Casey Davis

With Baker out of action, his bike was used to display this very cool Adidas seat cover. We've shown this to you in past Kickstarts, but thought it was worth another look. It's made from the same material as Adidas shoes and has actual Adidas striping on it. Photo by Casey Davis

This race marked the first win since 2009 for Chad Reed, and to say that he was just excited would be an understatement. After all the hard work of organizing his team for 2011, the win was proof that hard work really does pay off. In the race, Reed rode fast and consistent, leading from start to finish.

This race marked the first win since 2009 for Chad Reed, and to say that he was just excited would be an understatement. After all the hard work of organizing his team for 2011, the win was proof that hard work really does pay off. In the race, Reed rode fast and consistent, leading from almost start to finish.